Pain in the neck and why why you have it

Fix the pain in the neck

If your neck hurts while or after doing Pilates, let’s say in your 100’s, something’s up. First off: where does it hurt? 1. front or 2. back.

1. The front hurts:

Congratulations, you’re working your deep neck flexors and if you sit in front of a computer all day, they pretty much don’t exist. The computer posture or “turtle neck” is connected to many other imbalances (dysfunctions) in our body. Achy neck, tight and rounded forward shoulders, back pain… working your neck will tremendously improve all of the above. It’s important to know HOW to work your neck.

2. The back hurts

Check and see what muscles are actually contracted while lifting. Front or back. My bet: your muscles in the back of your neck are working (habitually holding your head up) and it’s not their job, at least in that position! Muscles pull bones. So get into the front of the neck to pull your head up, rather than pushing from the back. Start by just lifting the neck a tiny bit. Is the front activating? Then proceed to TILT your head on your neck, chin directionally moving towards the sternum to functionally stretch the back. Keep looking towards your toes or pubic bone to avoid the back muscles taking over. Keep the brain back to avoid more pushing from the back.

Important here:

If you can’t sustain the position for your 100’s, lower down. Don’t practice the shitty position. All you get is …. yeah, right! Be humble. Don’t do it because the neighbor is doing it too. Do YOU! Your instructor should be watching you and correct you if your head position is wrong. If your neck is weak, it will be challenging and maybe “hurting” a bit, but know you’re also getting stronger.

Please keep in mind, it takes time and effort to change your patterns, but know, you can change them!!!

 

#risepilates #risepilatessantafe#pilatesstrong #pilatesmat #100s#pilatesismytherapy #noglutesnoglory#fitspo #fitfam #fitfoodie #fitgirl #fitlife#fitnessmotivation #fitness #fitstagram#fitnessjourney #classicalpilates#originalpilates #returntolife #contrology#resist #counterrotate #anticipate

Show here: me and my double chin doing the 100’s.

Pilates and Scoliosis

 

Sco

Scoliosis in the spine can be a source of pain and discomfort for some people. While most of us have scoliosis to some degree that goes unnoticed or without complication, the more severe cases can make a normal pain free life impossible. While there are surgical options (bone dis-formation) the idiopathic scoliosis can be “treated” with plain old exercise, I personally would opt for Pilates.

Pilates is a wonderful tool to help change muscular imbalances and change posture and alignment. The Pilates equipment lends itself to create a very specific movement plan for each individual. Each clients need will be addresses. The client above is not only standing taller but her shoulders and hips are in a better place. Can you can see the difference? This was her first session and it took about 20 minutes.

If you suffer from Scoliosis it would benefit you to first balance your spine and hips before you exercise.  Avoid strengthening your faulty pattern. Let us help you in helping your body stand up straighter and perform better.

Pilates for Scoliosis. Find out more!

Call us today!  917-202-5162

#Risepilates #santafeNM #santafe #risepilatessantafe  #pilates #scoliosis #realign

Bad posture and why it matters

One thing that sticks out most when I find myself people watching, moving or standing are elevated front ribs. Posture. If I ask a client to side bend it mostly results into an extension in their ribcage first and a shift of their pelvis, possibly combined with rotation second, but let’s focus on one thing…

My own story – posture:

Many times in my life I was told  that I am hyper-lordodic (too much lumbar curve).  I own a fair share of booty.  That increases the look of hyper lordosis. Some movement teachers asked me in the past to just tuck my pelvis under to make the curve flatten out. Problem fixed. Moving on. NOT!

That led me down a long and painful road of lower back issues. SI problems and non functioning glutes, tight hamstrings, tight hip-flexors and quads. Because what really happens is a dysfunctional engagement in the glute maximus, a stretch on the thoraco lumbar faschia, over shortening of the hamstrings. Resulting in tight calves and hip flexors and quads are holding on for dear life. Am I confusing you?

When I met Jonathan FitzGordon and he told me right away that I was  I too was a sway back. I had a hard time believing him, a very hard time… Well, long story short, he was right. I had tried to correct a faulty pattern I didn’t even have. 

Not just you, it’s everybody…

Most people aren’t aware of their posture, at all. It’s not something we get taught in school and unless you’re a ballerina, into gymnastics or performing arts you probably never think of how you stand, look or move through space. Please correct me, if I’m wrong.
To balance weak glutes, the desk pasture, being taller than average, mimicking your parents’ pasture etc. … a lot of people end up with a sway back.

 

I am still on the road to “recovery”. It takes conscious effort each and every day to make a change. It’s as Jonathan says “well worth it”. I really like the quote from McGraw “practice doesn’t make perfect, practice makes permanent” . What we practice every day, is what we get in the end.

Once the ribs relax down (or as I like to think of it lately, my kidneys go back) the erector spinae muscles can actually do their job. The abdominals will get much more tone and the “tight backs” will disappear. The glutes will co-contract to provide much needed help for your spine erectors. Standing upright is not just their responsibility, your glutes have a huge part in it. At least they should. Your back starts to hurt less and less.

Sounds good?!

Ready to be more aware?

One thing that I hear over and over again from my clients is that they are more AWARE of their posture and able to make the small corrections.

In your first session I will assess your posture and show you potential weaknesses and simple, easy to do exercises to make a huge impact in your everyday life. Let’s get started!

Read Jonathan’s article that inspired this post here:

http://blog.corewalking.com/love-lift-front-ribcage/

lifted ribs                                                                       sway back

 

 

Workshop with Irene Dowd – a resilient Neck

Throw back:

In February (2013), I once again had the opportunity to study with Irene Dowd. She is such a legend in the world of anatomy and movement and I always jump on every opportunity to learn from her. This was a 3 hr. workshop on the neck, giving us simple, yet effective strategies for everyone (with and without equipment) to be done throughout the day, sitting at your desk to create ease in your neck and shoulders.

How we socially interact with our face, the way we listen (does one ear hear better than the other? If so you are more likely to present that ear and move your neck and head off-center) how we look, taste and chew is influenced by the way we move our necks.

Learning by doing:

First we located the cervical vertebrae, palpating them and looking at their movement possibilities. We teamed up and observed our partners range of motion in a “yes” and “no” motion. The atlanto-occipital joint = yes, has about 15-20 degrees of flexion and extension combined. The atlanto-axial joint =no has about 35-40 degrees of rotation on each side. Combining flexion/ extension and rotation is a whole different ballgame. We observed the lack of symmetry and imbalances in ourselves and were prompted to write down our scores to compare them, after we did the mini-movement sequences Irene has developed. What a surprise, all of us had either evened out imbalances or increased range of motion.

Posterior atlantoöccipital membrane and atlant...

Posterior atlantoöccipital membrane and atlantoaxial ligament. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The muscles of the neck work synergistically with our eyes. You can test this by putting your hands at the back of your neck, right underneath the skull at either side of your cervical spine with slight pressure. Look straight ahead and then to the left, without moving your head and then to the right. It is very subtle, but you can feel the muscles activating and preparing to move your head. You might have to try this a couple of times before you first feel it. This means, where your eyes go during exercise, your neck wants to rotate your head to. So be aware where you look when you rotate your spine. If your eyes stay straight, your brain is not able to tell your body to move and the range of motion you experience in your rotation is much smaller or might feel constricted.The same goes for flexion (Ab-curl, “crunch”) look at the ceiling first and start the movement with your eyes, wandering across the ceiling to the wall in front of you, to your knees (they may be in the tabletop position or feet on the floor) and experience an easier, possibly increased flexion in your thoracic spine and more ease (or work in the front neck, which is desired in cervical flexion) in performing the 100’s.

Muscles of the neck. Anterior view.

Muscles of the neck. Anterior view. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Did you know

that we have more muscles in the back of the neck than in the front?  The posterior (in the back) muscles support our head as we reach our faces forward (palpate by putting your hands on the neck and move your head forward). Too much reaching forward (by listening, looking, eating, talking) will fatigue those muscles and one might even feel pain. Also, our brain being in the back of our skull is much heavier than the front of our face, needs to be balanced out.

The muscles on the side and in the front are less numerous and are very important for balancing our head. They are usually underdeveloped, especially sitting at a desk all day doing computer work (I can feel my posterior muscles screaming at me already). Tilting your head backwards gives ease to the posterior muscles and allows them to relax for a while.

Another blog post with exercises will follow

Pushing the head forward resisting gently with your hand pressing against your forehead will activate the anterior neck muscles and put them to work.

Let’s leave it here for now, although there are many more interesting facts, if you have any questions about the micro-movement series, release techniques and strengthening exercises, contact me!  Just remember less is more when it comes to awakening muscles that are not quite working as they should, listen to your body, if it feels wrong, don’t do it and be aware of your range of motion. The way you sit and carry your head throughout the day is so important, how you talk, chew and look at your iPad (reading with it sitting on your laps for a long period of time might possibly be less desirable after you read this post).

Irene’s workshop schedule can be found here:http://www.nohopilates.com/workshops.htm

Irene and co-teacher Steven Fetherhuff demonstrating thoracic rotation.

 

Aging gracefully with Pilates

” The older we get the more we have to work.” Thats something one of my teachers said, and I’ll never forget it. She referred the the human body and the demand we put on it. Another saying that comes to my mind is “if you don’t use it, you’ll lose it”. Aging is something that’s going to happen even if we fight it, there’s no way around. One of the key signs for a healthy and young body is it’s ability to move well. Doing whatever you want and being able to do so without aches and pains.

What do you still want to do?

Playing tennis, golf, soccer, biking, climbing… walking, playing with the grand children, getting out of the chair without help, getting out of bed…? The list of demands we have can vary from day to day or decade to decade.

Working here in Santa Fe with a clientele that is up to  30 years older than my Brooklyn clients definitely challenges me on many different levels. Arthritis, Osteoporosis, Hip- and Knee replacements (no biggie). Just walking can sometimes be a challenge and it’s not the previous mentioned conditions that make us immobile but should we fall and break a bone can definitely throw a curve ball. I remember my late grandmother being in excellent condition up to the day when she had an unfortunate fall and being bed ridden for many weeks deteriorated her body (and mind) tremendously.

Here is how it’s done:

1. do something every day (walking is a great start)

2. challenge your balance

3. Do Pilates!

4. Do Pilates regularly. If you’re over 60 twice a week for 60min is the minimum if you want to see some results.

5. Start working your body early, don’t wait until you feel the signs of aging limiting your way of life.

 

And here are some great results:

81 years young and doing the Longstretch like a 18 year old. Bravo!

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What would you like to do, and is your body supporting that desire?

X-rayed movement, a clip worth watching

I’m not advocating for people to take a yoga class necessarily. I do like yoga but I think most people doing yoga shouldn’t be, especially in a group setting where the teacher has little to no chance to give appropriate corrections or is able to verbally cue one safely through the practice. I really only trust my body into the hands of one or two yoga teachers, the same thing applies to taking Pilates classes (well, maybe 4).

A wheel pose is not something I would ever want to put my body into. Why you ask? If I was supposed to be able to backbend to this extreme, I’d be able to do it without any issue. We are flexion biased “animals”. I could go on and on over this subject, maybe another time. I digress….

Here is a clip that’s pretty awesome and around 1.39min you can see the radius and ulnar turning and I think thats pretty fascinating.

My Mom’s testimonial – usually she’s my worst critic…

I spend a 3 week vacation in Santa Fe and worked with Chantall almost every day of my stay here. I’ve had persisting pain in my left leg and hip for months before but after the first Pilates session with Chantall, the pain almost disappeared. The following day I could walk free of pain. After 3 sessions I was climbing up Monte Sol. Taking a class every other day, I did my “homework” on the off-days, and the results were just overwhelming. I was pain free and seem to have lost 10 pounds. Eating more than usual, my figure changed and I gained a waist back that I thought long lost, I am 72 years old, and a waist is just not in the cards at that age… I am completely amazed, my whole outlook on life changed. I am excited to keep my personalized routine as part of my daily activities. Now being back in Germany, my friends can’t stop telling me how great I look. Thank you, Chantall!!!

Marie B., Germany

Thanks Mom, I love you!!!

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#tbt alert, this picture is about 1o years old but it’s my favorite pic with her.