Bad posture and why it matters

One thing that sticks out most when I find myself people watching, moving or standing are elevated front ribs. Posture. If I ask a client to side bend it mostly results into an extension in their ribcage first and a shift of their pelvis, possibly combined with rotation second, but let’s focus on one thing…

My own story – posture:

Many times in my life I was told  that I am hyper-lordodic (too much lumbar curve).  I own a fair share of booty.  That increases the look of hyper lordosis. Some movement teachers asked me in the past to just tuck my pelvis under to make the curve flatten out. Problem fixed. Moving on. NOT!

That led me down a long and painful road of lower back issues. SI problems and non functioning glutes, tight hamstrings, tight hip-flexors and quads. Because what really happens is a dysfunctional engagement in the glute maximus, a stretch on the thoraco lumbar faschia, over shortening of the hamstrings. Resulting in tight calves and hip flexors and quads are holding on for dear life. Am I confusing you?

When I met Jonathan FitzGordon and he told me right away that I was  I too was a sway back. I had a hard time believing him, a very hard time… Well, long story short, he was right. I had tried to correct a faulty pattern I didn’t even have. 

Not just you, it’s everybody…

Most people aren’t aware of their posture, at all. It’s not something we get taught in school and unless you’re a ballerina, into gymnastics or performing arts you probably never think of how you stand, look or move through space. Please correct me, if I’m wrong.
To balance weak glutes, the desk pasture, being taller than average, mimicking your parents’ pasture etc. … a lot of people end up with a sway back.


I am still on the road to “recovery”. It takes conscious effort each and every day to make a change. It’s as Jonathan says “well worth it”. I really like the quote from McGraw “practice doesn’t make perfect, practice makes permanent” . What we practice every day, is what we get in the end.

Once the ribs relax down (or as I like to think of it lately, my kidneys go back) the erector spinae muscles can actually do their job. The abdominals will get much more tone and the “tight backs” will disappear. The glutes will co-contract to provide much needed help for your spine erectors. Standing upright is not just their responsibility, your glutes have a huge part in it. At least they should. Your back starts to hurt less and less.

Sounds good?!

Ready to be more aware?

One thing that I hear over and over again from my clients is that they are more AWARE of their posture and able to make the small corrections.

In your first session I will assess your posture and show you potential weaknesses and simple, easy to do exercises to make a huge impact in your everyday life. Let’s get started!

Read Jonathan’s article that inspired this post here:

lifted ribs                                                                       sway back



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