Salt, are you eating enough?

Here are two mind blowing videos on the subject of Salt/ Sodium and the effects it has on the body. Dr. Dinicolantonio is extremely knowledgeable and helped publish over 200 scientific articles on the subject matter and wrote a book on this subject that I am currently reading and felt the need to share the information. Have a watch and see if you eat enough salt.

His book: https://www.amazon.com/Salt-Fix-Experts-Wrong-Eating/dp/0451496965/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1542403445&sr=8-1&keywords=the+salt+fix+by+dr+james+dinicolantonio

Bad posture and why it matters

One thing that sticks out most when I find myself people watching, moving or standing are elevated front ribs. Posture. If I ask a client to side bend it mostly results into an extension in their ribcage first and a shift of their pelvis, possibly combined with rotation second, but let’s focus on one thing…

My own story – posture:

Many times in my life I was told  that I am hyper-lordodic (too much lumbar curve).  I own a fair share of booty.  That increases the look of hyper lordosis. Some movement teachers asked me in the past to just tuck my pelvis under to make the curve flatten out. Problem fixed. Moving on. NOT!

That led me down a long and painful road of lower back issues. SI problems and non functioning glutes, tight hamstrings, tight hip-flexors and quads. Because what really happens is a dysfunctional engagement in the glute maximus, a stretch on the thoraco lumbar faschia, over shortening of the hamstrings. Resulting in tight calves and hip flexors and quads are holding on for dear life. Am I confusing you?

When I met Jonathan FitzGordon and he told me right away that I was  I too was a sway back. I had a hard time believing him, a very hard time… Well, long story short, he was right. I had tried to correct a faulty pattern I didn’t even have. 

Not just you, it’s everybody…

Most people aren’t aware of their posture, at all. It’s not something we get taught in school and unless you’re a ballerina, into gymnastics or performing arts you probably never think of how you stand, look or move through space. Please correct me, if I’m wrong.
To balance weak glutes, the desk pasture, being taller than average, mimicking your parents’ pasture etc. … a lot of people end up with a sway back.

 

I am still on the road to “recovery”. It takes conscious effort each and every day to make a change. It’s as Jonathan says “well worth it”. I really like the quote from McGraw “practice doesn’t make perfect, practice makes permanent” . What we practice every day, is what we get in the end.

Once the ribs relax down (or as I like to think of it lately, my kidneys go back) the erector spinae muscles can actually do their job. The abdominals will get much more tone and the “tight backs” will disappear. The glutes will co-contract to provide much needed help for your spine erectors. Standing upright is not just their responsibility, your glutes have a huge part in it. At least they should. Your back starts to hurt less and less.

Sounds good?!

Ready to be more aware?

One thing that I hear over and over again from my clients is that they are more AWARE of their posture and able to make the small corrections.

In your first session I will assess your posture and show you potential weaknesses and simple, easy to do exercises to make a huge impact in your everyday life. Let’s get started!

Read Jonathan’s article that inspired this post here:

http://blog.corewalking.com/love-lift-front-ribcage/

lifted ribs                                                                       sway back

 

 

Stop cracking your knuckles!

I found this little video today, and I can’t say how happy I am about it.

It shows very simply what happens to your joints when you pop or crack your fingers, hip, neck, etc. I used to be a big “neck cracker”. Until I found out what happens and that the cracking actually increases the swelling that makes you want to crack the joint even more. A vicious cycle.

Not just the swelling and constant pulling and stretching on ligaments and tendons but just a plain old bad habit. I wouldn’t recommend it to anybody, even if this clip says that there is no evidence for causing Arthritis. Destabilizing your body in any which way is not good. The Central Nervous System gets the message of “danger, we are loosing something here” and tightens up muscles around that joint. These muscles might not shut off when the “danger” is over and we become chronically tight. Especially muscles of surrounding joints. shoulders, upper back, even the lower back suffers if the neck is out of whack. In the end we are a sum of our dysfunctions and pain is the norm. Not a life I’d like to live…

How do you kick the habit?

Just don’t do it. Become aware. Realize when you want to crack and catch yourself before you start cracking. Choose not to do it. End of story. After a while (it can take up to a couple of months) you won’t find the need to do it anymore. The body heals and self regulates pretty well.

Wanna kick your cracking habit?

Questions? Contact me at Chantall@risepilates.com

 

The truth about stretching

This is a great article about stretching. More is NOT more, stretching with care is required or you’ll just get tighter or injure yourself.

Your Nervous System is running the show and it is so much more powerful then you.

Let’s talk about smart stretching, we can help you!

 

http://breakingmuscle.com/mobility-recovery/stretching-doesnt-work-the-way-you-think-it-does

IMG_3086

“Just because something has always been done a certain way, does that make it the best way”

This is a brilliant article on hollowing (the abdominals) vs. bracing them.

http://breakingmuscle.com/mobility-recovery/how-are-we-still-getting-it-wrong-abdominal-hollowing-vs-bracing

 

Hollowing which is a cue often used in the Pilates method but it actually destabilizes the spine and weakens the internal and external obliques.

Our body functions as one and  no one muscle can be isolated and there are always consequences for one muscle doing too much. We can not rely on our transverse abdominus (TA) to do all the stabilizing of the spine. We have many more options. Enter Lats, Spine extensors and QL, I’d add Psoas into the mix since he’s all snuggled up with our lumbar spine.

Singling out one muscle will not give you good results. This is why Pilates works. We always work muscles synergistically, deliberately and with precision and control.

 

Talk to us about creating super strength for your spine, we can help!